Jeffrey Geiger on the 2019-20 BAAS Founders’ Research Award

I am grateful to have been recipient of a BAAS Founders’ Award – the support has been invaluable to my research into the early uses of amateur colour film. The BAAS Founders’ Award provides UK scholars with financial assistance for research travel and invited conference presentations, and more recently has… Continue reading

African American Theatre and The S Street Salon

Community Building and Articulations of Race and Gender at Georgia Douglas Johnson’s 'Saturday Nighters'

This article is adapted from a presentation given at the London Arts and Humanities Partnership postgraduate conference, 21st January 2022 During the Harlem Renaissance period, 1461 S Street, Washington D.C., the home of Georgia Douglas Johnson (1877-1966), represented an important hub of creativity and community for African American women writers. ‘Saturday… Continue reading

Towards an intersectional theory of news selection in US-based broadcast journalism

This article is adapted from a presentation given at BAAS Postgraduate Symposium, 4th December 2021. This paper argues that by re-thinking ideas of how journalists decide what is and is not news through an intersectional lens, scholars will be better placed to evaluate journalism’s ability to accurately represent the communities… Continue reading

“Your Name is Safe”: The Ladder as lesbian literary community

This article is adapted from a presentation given at BAAS Postgraduate Symposium, 4th December 2021. In the second issue of the Ladder – the San Francisco-based lesbian literary magazine that circulated between 1956 and 1972 – Ann Ferguson published an article intended to reassure nervous subscribers, titled ‘Your Name is… Continue reading

The Afghanistan Effect: Isolationism in US Foreign Policy

On September 28th 2021, General Mark Milley, US Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, testified before the US Senate Armed Services Committee regarding the end of US military involvement in Afghanistan. The general responded to Senator Hawley’s question on the evacuation of US citizens: “Strategically, the war is lost.… Continue reading

Sampson Selig: the 1896 election and children in American political history

Children remain disenfranchised. They are formally divorced from political participation and are unable to directly influence who is elected to their local board of supervisors, never mind who enters the White House. But American political history is incomplete without considering the nation’s youngsters. Firstly, children wield immense soft political power… Continue reading

Taking Notice: Nature and Climate Change Deniers in American Climate Fiction

Climate change is no taboo topic as in recent years, figures and organisations such as Greta Thunberg and WWF have brought the on-going environmental crisis to the media’s forefront, presenting us with frankly terrifying statistics about our planet’s future if radical changes to our destructive behaviours are not made. Literature… Continue reading

The Historiography of Ethan Allen

Ethan Allen is widely celebrated as one of the founding fathers of Vermont, formerly called the New Hampshire Grants until it declared itself an independent republic in 1777. In the decades prior to Allen’s arrival in the Grants, the settlers (the majority of whom owned illegitimate land grants from New… Continue reading

Event Review: Student-Led Midlands3Cities American Studies Retreat, 22nd – 29th June 2018

Between the 22nd and 29th of June, 2018, a group of research students from across the East Midlands – united by a shared passion for American Studies – gathered in Matlock, Derbyshire, with the intention of bursting their academic bubbles. This academic retreat was a student-led project generously funded by the Midlands3Cities Doctoral Training Partnership (M3C) and was attended by both M3C and non-M3C PhD candidates representing Birmingham City University, Nottingham Trent University, the University of Leicester, and the University of Nottingham. Continue reading