Research Across Borders: Charlie Thompson, AHRC Library of Congress Fellow 2014

“As I flew out of Heathrow last October, I had tickets booked to fly home for two weeks to see my family over Christmas and New Year. By December, I had cancelled those tickets. I had met people I wanted to stay with in DC, had research I wanted to continue doing, and had made plans for events and things I wanted to see and do in and around Washington.” Continue reading

Review of ‘Myths in Culture’ Postgraduate Symposium 2014

“In his seminal Mythologies (1957), Barthes identifies myths as a type of speech, one that takes on universally acknowledged meanings which are rarely questioned. And although Barthes’ name was dropped only occasionally during “Myths in Culture”, a one-day postgraduate symposium at the University of Leicester, the spirit of his words were ever present.” Continue reading

Obama’s West Point Vision: Or, How to Retreat from Military Intervention and Democracy Promotion

“Ultimately, Obama’s stance represents an accommodation to the current reality that at present, America is unwilling and unable to pay the potential economic, military and political costs of a more expansive strategic and ideological posture.” Continue reading

Academic Job Applications “Do’s” and “Don’ts”

“Do stay positive. Writing an application is a great way of seeing how far you’ve come in your career and thinking about what you want to do next. Most people do not succeed at first try. You may have made a good impression that will help you in the future, even if you don’t get asked to an interview.” Continue reading

60 Seconds With Michelle Green

You’re stranded on a desert island, but luckily you pre-empted it. Which book do you take with you?

“I would invest in a poetry collection because novels ‘end’ — Imagine reaching the last page of a novel without rescue in sight. Grim.

With that in mind, H.D.’s Trilogy or the aptly titled edited collection, Staying Alive: Real Poems for Unreal Times.” Continue reading

Selling Houses to Buy a Dream: White Diaspora and the Suburbs in Richard Ford’s Bascombe Trilogy

“The issues raised in Independence Day and The Lay of the Land – rising house prices, shoddy construction, profiting on the back of others’ aspirations (for what else does a realtor do than make money from people in search of their dream home?) – are still remarkably relevant today. The Markhams fall victim to their own outsized ambitions but also to the upswing of a property bubble that eventually crashed with devastating consequences for millions across America.” Continue reading