Loading Events

« All Events

“Uncertain landscapes”: representations and practices of space in the age of the Anthropocene

Université de Strasbourg

October 20 - October 21

“Uncertain landscapes”: representations and practices of space in the age of the Anthropocene.

 

Université de Strasbourg, 20-21 October 2022

International conference

Organised by SEARCH (UR 2325, Université de Strasbourg),

MGNE (UR 1341, Université de Strasbourg), CHER (UR 4376, Université de Strasbourg), Haute Ecole des Arts du Rhin

With the support of the MISHA (Maison Interuniversitaire des Sciences de l’Homme – Alsace) and the IUF

 

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

“Uncertain landscapes”: representations and practices of space 

in the age of the Anthropocene.

 

Maison Interuniversitaire des Sciences de l’Homme – Alsace

Université de Strasbourg

20-21 October 2022

 

Keynote speaker: Pr Mark Cheetham, Department of Art History, University of Toronto 

“A working country is hardly ever a landscape. The very idea of landscape implies separation and observation.” (Williams, 1973) In this well-known statement, Raymond Williams expresses the view, often reformulated by cultural geographers and philosophers since the 1980s, that the idea of landscape always supposes a distancing process, whether it is a dissociation between the observed environment and the observing subject or, to use Alain Roger’s term, an “artialization,” a break with the natural world that allows environments to be constructed or represented according to aesthetic values (Roger, 1997).

Beyond this cultural separation, the history of the idea of landscape in Western thought seems to be punctuated by moments of tension between the natural world and man, in which aesthetic constructions of nature appear to be correlated with a sense of loss. Thus, just as forms of severance from rural life in the early modern period seem to have led to an aesthetic perception of environments that was dissociated from their use as working spaces, the flourishing of landscape painting in the Romantic period could be understood as a response to the tensions generated by industrialization.

In an era defined by some as the Anthropocene (Crutzen, 2002), in which it is increasingly difficult to deny the acceleration and irreversibility of environmental damage as a result of human action, the concept of landscape has become the subject of multiple debates and redefinitions. The necessity to give aesthetic meaning to the spaces which we inhabit, as well as renew our social and political commitment to them, seems to be more urgent than ever. The paradigm of landscape as it was constructed in the early modern era no longer seems to give satisfactory answers to contemporary concerns, which emphasize the imbalances and degradations caused by decades of industrial exploitation and intensive agriculture. The contemplation of nature, far from conveying a reassuring sense of permanence, goes together with our awareness of humanity’s responsibility in what appears to be an ultimate crisis. While some consider that the idea of landscape is no longer relevant and put forward the notion of “post-landscape” (Wall 2017), others experiment with new aesthetic spatialities and outline new artistic practices of space.

In this context, the history of the landscape idea is re-examined by academics as well as political actors. In historical studies, the primacy of landscape as representation or “abstract picture of the world” is being questioned, with a new focus on landscape as “a way to inhabit the land” (Dauphant, 2018, 30). The role played by the landscape idea in the colonial imaginary as an instrument of appropriation is also underlined, allowing non-European cultures to challenge or even reinvest the concept. Once the historicity of the landscape idea is acknowledged, it becomes possible to explore the diversity of aesthetic conceptions of spaces that are simultaneously perceived, conceived and lived, to use Henri Lefebvre’s categories (1974). This diversity expresses itself in concrete ways of appreciating and experiencing landscape, such as French or English gardens, rural enclosures or open fields, and perhaps especially in changes of perception through time. For example, the “wilderness” was long perceived as terrifying before becoming desirable in the 19th century (R. F. Nash, 1967), and has now become an objective and symbol of preservation in the context of the Anthropocene. It is essential to acknowledge the ideological implications of such perceptions and their material, social and political impacts, when, for example, they justify the appropriation of territories for the sake of preserving a fantasized pristine landscape, untouched by humans (Black, 2012).

This conference aims to reassess the notion of landscape, understood in an aesthetic, social and political sense, and its current relevance to contemporary environmental challenges. While raising the question of the historical conditions of its construction and transformations, it proposes to examine its relevance today, its new meanings, as well as the practices of space and political actions that are now possible and justified. The emphasis will be on the artistic practices of the industrial and postindustrial eras as sources of resilience or reflection – in the visual arts and literature – as well as the idea of landscape, in its diachronic dimension, in order to reflect on the various ways in which it is possible to reassess our relationship to the environment in the context of the Anthropocene.

We welcome proposals on topics that may include, among others:

– new aesthetic and artistic spatialities (site-specific art, Land Art, Earthworks)

– cultural variations on the idea of landscape

– the inscriptions and traces of human history in landscapes

– contemporary ruins

– The shift from the notion of landscape to that of site in the 1960s

– soundscapes

– contemporary forms of political commitment in relation to specific landscapes (such as natural or urban parks, shorelines that are threatened by rising waters, sacred territories)

– inequalities of access to landscapes

– the inclusion of the idea of landscape in urban policies, in the context of ecological transition

– the questioning and rethinking of anthropocentric approaches to nature

– the role of landscapes in psychological well-being

 

Please send a 250 to 300-word abstract, as well as a short bio, before May 15th, to the following addresses: sbaudry[at]unistra.fr (Sandrine Baudry), hibata[at]unistra.fr (Hélène Ibata), f.moghaddassi[at]unistra.fr (Fanny Moghaddassi)

 

Organising committee: 

Sandrine Baudry (University of Strasbourg, SEARCH EA 2325)

Emmanuel Behague (University of Strasbourg, Mondes Germaniques et Nord-Européens)

Gwendolyne Cressman (University of Strasbourg, SEARCH EA 2325)

Francesco d’Antonio (University of Strasbourg, CHER)

Olivier Deloignon (Haute Ecole des Arts du Rhin)

Hélène Ibata (University of Strasbourg, SEARCH EA 2325)

Monica Manolescu (University of Strasbourg, SEARCH EA 2325; Institut Universitaire de France)

Melanie Meunier (University of Strasbourg, SEARCH EA 2325)

Fanny Moghaddassi (University of Strasbourg, SEARCH EA 2325)

Thomas Mohnike (University of Strasbourg, Mondes Germaniques et Nord-Européens)

Gérard Starck (Haute Ecole des Arts du Rhin)

 

References:

Black, George, Empire of Shadows: the Epic Story of Yellowstone, London: Macmillan, 2012.

Crutzen, Paul, “The Geology of Mankind,” Nature, 415, 23.

Dauphant, Léonard, Géographies. Ce qu’ils savaient de la France (1100-1600), Ceyzérieu: Champ Vallon, 2018.

Lefebvre, Henri, La production de l’espace, Paris : Anthropos, 1974.

Nash, Roderick Frazier, Wilderness and the American Mind, 1967. 5th Edition, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2014.

Roger, Alain, Court traité du paysage, Paris : Gallimard, 1997.

Wall, Ed, “Post-landscape,” in Wall, E. and Waterman, T., Landscape and Agency: Critical Essays, London: Routledge, 2017.

Williams, Raymond, The Country and the City, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1973.

 

 

Colloque international

Organisé par SEARCH (UR 2325, Université de Strasbourg),

MGNE (UR 1341, Université de Strasbourg), CHER (UR 4376, Université de Strasbourg), Haute Ecole des Arts du Rhin

Avec le soutien de la MISHA (Maison Interuniversitaire des Sciences de l’Homme – Alsace) et de l’IUF

 

APPEL A COMMUNICATIONS

Paysages incertains : représentations et pratiques de l’espace à l’heure de l’anthropocène

Maison Interuniversitaire des Sciences de l’Homme – Alsace

Université de Strasbourg 20-21 octobre 2022

 

Invité d’honneur : Pr  Mark Cheetham, Department of Art History, University of Toronto

« Une terre qu’on travaille n’est presque jamais un paysage. L’idée même de paysage suppose l’existence d’un observateur séparé » (Williams, 1977). Dans cette observation, Raymond Williams exprime l’idée, souvent reprise par la géographie culturelle aussi bien que par les philosophes depuis les années 1980, que la pensée du paysage suppose toujours une séparation, qu’il s’agisse d’une dissociation entre environnement observé et sujet observateur, ou pour reprendre le terme d’Alain Roger, d’une « artialisation », d’une rupture avec le monde naturel permettant de construire ou représenter les environnements selon des valeurs esthétiques (Roger, 2001).

Au-delà de cette séparation d’ordre culturel, l’histoire de l’idée de paysage dans la pensée occidentale semble être ponctuée d’épisodes de tension entre le monde naturel et l’homme, dans lesquels les constructions esthétiques de la nature semblent de plus en plus souvent corrélées à un sentiment de perte. Ainsi, de même qu’un premier éloignement par rapport à la ruralité semble avoir suscité le développement d’un regard esthétique sur des environnements auparavant imbriqués dans la réalité du travail quotidien, l’épanouissement de la peinture de paysage à l’époque romantique pourrait être conçu comme une réponse aux premières tensions générées par l’ère industrielle.

A l’heure de l’anthropocène (Crutzen, 2002), alors que le constat d’une dégradation accélérée et irréversible des milieux naturels sous l’effet de l’action humaine s’impose, le concept de paysage traverse de multiples redéfinitions. La nécessité de donner un sens esthétique aux espaces dans lesquels nous vivons, mais aussi d’y renouveler l’engagement social et politique, semble plus pressante que jamais. Le paradigme du paysage tel qu’il a été construit au début de l’ère moderne ne paraît plus toujours apporter de résolution satisfaisante aux interrogations contemporaines, qui mettent l’accent sur les dégradations causées par des décennies d’exploitation industrielle ou d’agriculture intensive. La contemplation de la nature, loin de suggérer une pérennité rassurante, se double nécessairement d’une conscience de la responsabilité portée par l’humanité dans ce qui paraît être une crise ultime. Alors que certains affirment que notre époque est celle du « post-paysage » (Wall 2017), suggérant que l’idée n’est plus pertinente dans le contexte actuel, d’autres expérimentent de nouvelles pratiques artistiques de l’espace.

Dans ce contexte, l’histoire du concept de paysage se voit interrogée et repensée, tant dans le monde universitaire que dans le champ de l’action politique. Dans le domaine des études historiques, le primat accordé au paysage en tant que représentation ou “tableau abstrait du monde” se trouve remis en question alors que s’affirme une conception du paysage comme “façon d’habiter la terre” (L. Dauphant, 2018, 30). Explorer différentes façons d’apprécier l’environnement et de l’habiter implique également de repenser le paysage à l’aune des expériences et revendications longtemps ignorées de cultures non-européennes, qui se réapproprient le concept de paysage, utilisé contre leurs intérêts dans le cadre colonial, notamment à des fins de restauration de souveraineté.

Cela permet aussi d’explorer la diversité des conceptions esthétiques de paysages perçus, conçus et vécus, pour reprendre les catégories de l’espace urbain développées par H. Lefebvre (1974). Cette diversité s’incarne dans des manifestations concrètes des manières d’apprécier et de vivre les paysages, comme par exemple les jardins à la française ou à l’anglaise, les paysages ruraux de bocage ou remembrés, etc. De même, la perception d’un paysage donné peut évoluer dans le temps ; ainsi, la « wilderness » a longtemps été pensée comme terrifiante avant de devenir désirable au 19ème siècle (R. N. Nash, 1967), puis enjeu et symbole de préservation dans le contexte de l’anthropocène. Il est essentiel de reconnaître les impacts matériels, sociaux et politiques de l’instrumentalisation de ces perceptions, qui peuvent conduire à justifier l’accaparement de territoires au nom de cette préservation d’un paysage fantasmé comme n’ayant jamais subi l’impact de l’activité humaine (Black, 2012).

Ce colloque propose d’explorer la notion de paysage dans ses dimensions esthétique, sociale et politique, et sa pertinence actuelle face aux défis environnementaux contemporains. Tout en posant la question des conditions historiques de sa construction et de ses métamorphoses, ainsi que celle de sa validité, il propose d’examiner l’évolution de sa signification dans ce nouveau contexte, mais aussi les pratiques artistiques de l’espace ou les revendications politiques qui sont aujourd’hui possibles et justifiées.  L’accent sera mis aussi bien sur les pratiques artistiques de l’ère industrielle comme sources de résilience ou de réflexion (arts visuels, littérature), que sur la pensée du paysage elle-même, dans sa dimension historique, afin notamment de réfléchir aux différents moyens de repenser notre rapport au monde naturel dans le contexte de l’anthropocène.

Les communications pourront porter, entre autres, sur :

– les nouvelles spatialités esthétiques (art in situ, Land Art, Earthworks)

– les variations culturelles de la notion de paysage

– les inscriptions, traces et empreintes de l’histoire humaine dans le paysage (laissées par les conflits ou l’activité industrielle, par exemple)

– les ruines contemporaines

– Le passage de la notion de paysage à la notion de site dans les années 1960

– les paysages sonores

– les formes contemporaines d’engagement politique autour de certains paysages (parcs naturels ou urbains, rivages menacés par la montée des eaux, territoires sacrés, etc.)

– l’accès inégalitaire aux paysages

– l’intégration de l’idée de paysage dans les politiques urbaines, dans le cadre de la transition écologique

– les possibilités de repenser l’approche anthropocentrée de la nature

– le rôle des paysages dans le bien-être psychologique

 

 

Les propositions de communication devront comporter un résumé de 250 à 300 mots ainsi qu’une biographie courte. Elles sont à envoyer avant le 15 mai aux adresses suivantes: sbaudry[at]unistra.fr (Sandrine Baudry), hibata[at]unistra.fr (Hélène Ibata), f.moghaddassi[at]unistra.fr (Fanny Moghaddassi)

 

Comité d’organisation: 

Sandrine Baudry (Université de Strasbourg, SEARCH EA 2325)

Emmanuel Behague (Université de Strasbourg, Mondes Germaniques et Nord-Européens)

Gwendolyne Cressman (Université de Strasbourg, SEARCH EA 2325)

Francesco d’Antonio (Université de Strasbourg, CHER)

Olivier Deloignon (Haute Ecole des Arts du Rhin)

Hélène Ibata (Université de Strasbourg, SEARCH EA 2325)

Monica Manolescu (Université de Strasbourg, SEARCH EA 2325; Institut Universitaire de France)

Melanie Meunier (Université de Strasbourg, SEARCH EA 2325)

Fanny Moghaddassi (Université de Strasbourg, SEARCH EA 2325)

Thomas Mohnike (Université de Strasbourg, Mondes Germaniques et Nord-Européens)

Gérard Starck (Haute Ecole des Arts du Rhin)

 

References:

Black, George, Empire of Shadows: the Epic Story of Yellowstone, London: Macmillan, 2012.

Crutzen, Paul, “The Geology of Mankind,” Nature, 415, 23.

Dauphant, Léonard, Géographies. Ce qu’ils savaient de la France (1100-1600), Ceyzérieu: Champ Vallon, 2018.

Lefebvre, Henri, La production de l’espace, Paris : Anthropos, 1974.

Nash, Roderick Frazier, Wilderness and the American Mind, 1967. 5th Edition, New Haven, CT.: Yale University Press, 2014.

Roger, Alain, Court traité du paysage, Paris : Gallimard, 1997.

Wall, Ed, “Post-landscape,” in Wall, E. and Waterman, T., Landscape and Agency: Critical Essays, Routledge, 2017.

Williams, Raymond, The Country and the City, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1973.

Details

Start:
October 20
End:
October 21
Event Category:
Website:
https://search.unistra.fr/actualites/actualite/cfp-uncertain-landscapes

Organizer

Université de Strasbourg