Book Review: Why White Liberals Fail: Race And Southern Politics From Fdr To Trump By Anthony J. Badger

Why White Liberals Fail is a thought-provoking addition to a field that neglects the role white liberals played in the South’s political transformation. What is more, Badger’s research as an opening gambit – a thesis that he hopes will spark renewed interest in white southern liberalism. The relative brevity of the book (around 200 pages) and the wide, expansive chronology leaves ample scope for more focused studies by a new crop of southern historians. Continue reading

Book Review: Beauty and the Brain by Rachel E. Walker

Walker does a wonderful job providing an in-depth survey of primary resources which demonstrate phrenology and physiognomy in the writing of people who are often overlooked, although the text could have gone further with the way it interprets these texts to answers larger questions about race, gender, politics, and religion in the early days of the United States. Continue reading

Book Review: Fugitive Movements Commemorating the Denmark Vesey Affair and Black Radical Antislavery in the Atlantic World

A vitally interesting collection of essays which situate Denmark Vesey and the antislavery rebellion within the current scholarship on abolition that places Black activists at the center of the story. Dr. Holland, however, reviews that the overreaching themes struggle for room against each other within the limited space of a single volume, and many of the essays only able to give a brief insight into their topics due to the limited room available. Continue reading

Book Review: Latin American Documentary Narratives: The Intersections of Storytelling and Journalism in Contemporary Literature

Latin American Documentary Narratives reflects the robust journalism of the 1960s journalists whose stories present different creative approaches the journalists had to take within censored environments, using literary strategies to reproduce real testimonies. The movements of the Peronist era during the 20th and 21st centuries, like the Tacuara Nationalist Movement and the National Justicialist Movement, have put a halt on journalism and the publication of free press stories in the newspapers, forcing writers to employ metaphors and allegories to indicate the facts. Chávez Diaz’s work provides a glimpse into political instability in the form of narratives, through which she provides insightful research that enriches the readers’ knowledge about recent historical events. Continue reading

Book Review: Writing the Mind: Social Cognition in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction

An interdisciplinary book on literary cognitive theory and how it can enhance our understanding with nineteenth-century American literature. Explored through the authors’ portrayal of the unique passages and methodology of the novels and stories to situate their own experiment in the mind of the characters within the greater American literary tradition of socio-cognitive experimentation. Continue reading

Book review: Contesting Commemoration: The 1876 Centennial, Independence Day, and the Reconstruction-Era South.

   Louisiana State University Press, 2021. $45.00   How does a nation celebrate itself when it is in many ways still at war with itself? Jack Noe tackles this question in his engaging study of nationalism and identity in the post-Civil War South through the lens of Independence Day celebrations… Continue reading

Book Review: Law in American Meeting Houses: Church Discipline and Civil Authority in Kentucky, 1780-1845

Edward Manger reviews Jeffrey Thomas Perry’s Law in American Meeting Houses, exploring the individual stories of communities of believers attempting to negotiate life in a new republic from the Revolutionary Era through the mid-nineteenth century. Continue reading

Book review: The Presidency of Donald J. Trump: A First Historical Assessment

With The Presidency of Donald J. Trump (2022) a prominent group of historians take on the challenge of providing a first historical assessment of an administration which editor Julian Zelizer describes as ‘unlike anything else American democracy had experienced in recent decades, if ever’ Oscar Winberg, PhD, reviews new book where leading historians provide perspective Donald Trump’s four turbulent years in the White House. Continue reading

Book Review: The Lone Leopard

The Lone Leopard, the new novel by Dr. Sharifullah Dorani, speaks to Afghanistan’s diversity, historical turbulence and future uncertainty through the coming-of-age story of four friends; Ahmad, Bakhtash, Wazir and the defiant young woman Frishta – as their intersecting, often conflicting paths are shaped by years of civil war, Taliban rule and American occupation. Continue reading